Archive for the ‘Mycological’ Category

SOMA camp – it’s coming!

Thursday, December 13th, 2012

SOMA camp is a production of the Sonoma County Mycological Association – a club known hereabouts as “SOMA”.  Yes, not only does that mostly cover the initial letters of “Sonoma County Mycological Association” it’s also a reference to SOMA, the “divine mushroom of immortality”, as described in R. Gordon Wasson’s book.

SOMA camp is a great production. It’s on three-day Martin Luther King, Jr. day weekend, the next one is January 19-21, 2013. There are activities for all mycological interests:

  • Cultivation (i.e. growing mushrooms)
  • Cooking (i.e. picking and eating edible mushrooms)
  • Crafts (i.e. dyeing, papermaking, and other things)
  • Collecting (i.e. going on field trips to actually pick mushrooms)
  • Photography (i.e. taking pictures of mushrooms you’ve never seen before)
  • Identifying (i.e. all the different ways features of mushrooms are looked at)

It’s a great 3-day weekend. And if you’re interested in mushrooms, it’s even better!

 

Ecovative (no that’s not a typo)

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

This guy grows fungal mycelium into useful industrial shapes.  Packing material. Home insulation. Beams for stick houses.

SOMA camp 2010 – success!

Monday, February 1st, 2010

SOMA camp 2010 in Occidental, CA was over January 18. I was “in charge” of the sorting & display tables of the mushrooms.  It was a very soggy affair. Rain rain rain rain.  Since the planners knew rain was coming, they setup a large tent on the outdoor deck and hung fluorescent lighting in it. It was great.  The only drawback was that it was no big enough to hold all the mushrooms.   All the Hygrophoraceae, Russulaceae, and Clavavariaceae had to sit out on tables under the upper deck.  By the time the weekend was over, their display plates were filled with rainwater and the mushrooms were lying in puddles.

A great thing about the outdoor tent was that it kept the mushrooms in an excellent environmental control. Lots of humidity and cool temperatures. All the display specimens held up well for the entire weekend.

If you want to see the list of species found, I’ve photographed and posted them all to MushroomObserver.org, where you can scroll through the 200+ species found.  There were undoubtedly many others that did not get out of the experts baskets, I’m sure.

I’m slowly learning the west-coast mushrooms.  But it is slow going.